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Remembering Sister Anne Marie (Grace Cecile) Furiel, OSF

Furiel_webOn the evening of August 25, our Sister Anne Marie Furiel was called by the Lord she loved and served so well to enter into eternal peace and joy — where heavenly choirs no doubt welcomed her!

Born January 31, 1925, to Olga (Hermann) Furiel and Thomas Furiel, Anne Marie was baptized Anna Mae but later was called Anne Marie. She was raised in Joliet and attended St. Francis Academy (now Joliet Catholic Academy) and the College of St. Francis (now the University of St. Francis) where she earned both Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Music degrees.

Anne Marie entered the postulancy of the Joliet Franciscans on February 1, 1942 – just one day after her seventeenth birthday. When she became a novice she was given the name “Sister Grace Cecile.” Years later she returned to the name by which we know her – Sister Anne Marie.

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Remembering Sister Rosemary (M. Robert Therese) Small, OSF

Rosemary_Small_webLate in the evening of February 22, 2013, drawn by the powers of Heaven, with God’s wisdom to guide her, God’s hand to guard her, and the way to God lying before her, our sister, Rosemary, took leave of those whom she loved in this life and readied herself to proclaim the ancient words that would herald her entrance into eternal life: Thagann chun cinn agam inniu – “I arise today.”

From the day of her birth, on June 30, 1935, Rosemary took great delight in surprising others. Joined by her beloved twin brother, Robert, she truly amazed her unsuspecting parents, Michael and Mary Agnes (Mulligan) Small) as only twins can do. As the treasured daughter of first generation Irish immigrants, Rosemary was baptized at St. Leo’s Parish, dedicated to the Trinity, and entrusted to the care of Mary, Queen of Ireland. Full of wonder and curiosity, she possessed a keen intellect, a gentle sense of humor, a kind heart and a determined spirit. Welcoming the birth of her dear sister Nancy, she enthusiastically assumed the role of lifelong “big sister” and readily embraced the values of her faith-filled, devoted and hard-working family. Growing up in the Englewood neighborhood of Chicago’s south side in the aftermath of the Great Depression, Rosemary’s childhood was lived amidst the uncertainties and insecurities of a world at war. Ever mindful of her own Irish heritage and immigrant roots, she learned from an early age to be attentive to issues of justice and human dignity. Making the most of every opportunity made available to her at Sacred Heart Parish, Rosemary attached herself with great affection to the Joliet Franciscan Sisters who fostered in her a growing sense of her own vocation to religious life.

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Remembering Sister Margaret (Jean Marie) Duffy, OSF

Duffy_Margaret_webSister Margaret Duffy (Jean Marie) was a native of Columbus, Ohio, and was one of eight children born to James and Susan (Handiboe) Duffy. She was preceded in death by her parents, her brothers: John, Edward, Joseph and Billy; and her sisters: Sister Mary Duffy, OSF, Catherine Hoffman and Terese Weisenbach.

Before entering religious life, Sister Margaret was a member of St. Thomas Parish in Columbus, Ohio, and attended the parish grade school. She graduated from St. Mary High School in Columbus and earned a bachelor of arts degree from the College of St. Francis (University of St. Francis) in Joliet, Illinois, and a master of arts degree from DePaul University in Chicago.

Margaret Duffy was a “go to” person in all her roles in life. Margie, as the family called her, was from her earliest days blessed with a pleasant disposition which she always attributed to the Handiboe genes. She would take life as it came and with a flexibility and straight forward, no nonsense approach that endeared her to many. When Margaret met the Sisters of Saint Francis from Joliet at Saint Mary High School in Columbus, Ohio, she immediately knew her calling to be a Sister. Mary Duffy, her oldest sister, was communicating with the Sisters about entering herself, but times were hard and Mary was, for a while at least, the only full time worker in the family, using skills honed in her business courses at St. Mary’s. Margaret knew that after graduation she, too, would have to help support the family, and she did so for two years working at the U.S. Army Depot as a secretary to Colonel Morrill. But in January of 1944, Margaret left home to enter the postulancy. The advice of her father that morning was, “Do what the Sisters tell you to do.” Margaret would recall those words many times during her nearly 70 years in our Congregation, and she rightly believed that she followed them.

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